What are actually the habits of companies that build remarkable software?

What are actually the habits of companies that build remarkable software?

Friday, I had an entertaining catch-up call with my dear ex-colleague Christian Weichelt. We came to talk about the power of habits. His mantra: “Don’t control the output; control the inputs.”

By controlling the inputs, you establish habits – and with that, you move closer to your goals every day. It’s a simple but super powerful concept.

For example, I’ve promised myself for months to get on my spinning bike for 30 minutes at the end of my day and failed….until I decided it was going to be the first thing I’d do when I get out of bed every morning. Today it shows a 200-day streak – and a much fitter me is the result.

So, I reflected on this – and wondered, ‘What are the habits of companies that build the software products we keep talking about?”
I mean, creating something remarkable in the eyes of our customers isn’t something that you do once. It’s a continuous process because it’s a moving target. What’s remarkable today isn’t necessarily remarkable tomorrow.

It’s not something you do at the end of the process – it’s essential to pay attention to every step of the design, build, test, launch, sales, and support process.

In my book The Remarkable Effect (you can find a link to free Kindle in the 1st comment), I highlight the ten traits that define Remarkable Software companies. But these are the prominent characteristics. So what are the habits?

Through my reflection, I ended up with this top 10 list of the things I see around me with the tech-entrepreneurs I closely work with:

  1. In everything they do, they prioritize ‘just start’ and don’t overthink
  2. When they research, they go deep on how they can help someone make a difference instead of everyone.
  3. When they meet, they actively listen – to learn, instead of aiming to answer.
  4. When they design, they spend extra time creating the magic moments instead of just the table stakes.
  5. When they create, they prioritize iteration over perfection.
  6. When they test, they pay attention to the desired emotional reaction, rather than only focusing on accuracy.
  7. When they communicate, they actively showcase empathy and talk with their customer rather than at their customer.
  8. When they launch, they focus on incorporating captivating stories about the transformation experience.
  9. When they position, they concentrate on the desired outcomes or core believes of their ideal customers, rather than the category they’re in
  10. When they sell, they aim to be different, not just better.

I am eager to hear what habits you see around you that set you up in the right way to create something your customers just keep talking about.